The East Area Rapist – Hospitals and Jack from Quincy

The East Area Rapist and Original Night Stalker operated for ten years in the state of California. There could be more years that we are unaware of, but what we do know is that he frequented at least twenty different towns throughout northern and southern California. However, it’s important to remember that he wasn’t the only criminal at this time; there were several rapists and serial killers who were in the general area overlapping each other.

As such, the ample amount of details we have of incidents happening in the neighborhoods of victims prior to being attacked is substantial. Not everything can be attributed to him, especially when strange coincidences potentially rule him out. For example, the East Area Rapist attacked his forty-fifth victim in Walnut Creek on June 2, 1979. Shortly thereafter, two people were detained for having possible involvement but they were ruled out.

One was an individual who was in the proximity and swerving in-and-out of traffic in a 1978 Cutlass. The police pulled the suspect over on the suspicion he was under the influence of alcohol. When the police spoke to the man, they noticed he matched the attacker’s description given by the victim. She also claimed her offender had a large hunting knife in its sheath during the assault. Coincidentally enough, this man had a knife in its sheath and a pair of gloves in his car, but he was heavily questioned and his alibi was confirmed.

The second incident also happened shortly after the assault occurred. A nearby neighbor called the police to report a peculiar man who was prowling in the area with no pants on. The police managed to locate the male rather quickly. He claimed he was a janitor in Pleasant Hill, California, and he was in the area looking for his missing cat. Inside of his vehicle was a camera and a stash of photographs of women taken in secret with a zoomed lens. The latest picture he took was of a woman at a car wash earlier that evening. After the police escorted him to jail, he was questioned and subsequently let go (although there aren’t any details publically on why he was released).

These two events taking place mere minutes after the victim was attacked is quite astonishing, especially when the proximity of these incidents were very close to one another. This anecdote presents that fact that coincidences happen frequently, and that leads me to the point of this post that I’m trying to convey.

At approximately 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 30, 1978, at Riverside Convalescent Hospital in Sacramento, California, a man approached a young nurse and introduced himself as “Jack from the town of Quincy.” He appeared to be in his early twenties with a medium-sized body frame and between 5’8-5’10 in height. He had neatly trimmed light brown hair and was wearing a blue windbreaker. As he spoke with the nurse, he began relaying uncomfortable information–stating he was upset because he had sexual issues and his father had a girlfriend. He went on to mention being a former patient at a psychiatric ward in Sacramento. Thereafter, he started singing “I’ll Walk the Line” by Johnny Cash, which prompted the nurse to ask him to leave the premises.

Two weeks later on the evening of Monday, April 10, 1978, the same nurse was outside of the hospital building making sure the windows were all secure. Unexpectedly, she was approached from behind by the same man she encountered weeks beforehand. He attempted to bring up his sexual problems again but the nurse was adamant about being busy and unable to speak but offered to make a phone call to set up an appointment with a counselor if he would like. He refused by saying he was already seeking help from a psychiatrist. She kindly asked him to leave and he never returned.

We can’t say with concrete certainty this was the East Area Rapist. However, I’d like to present two reasons — albeit circumstantial and anecdotal — as to why it could possibly be an authentic encounter with the suspect.

Number 1

The most important reason is the location and timeline of events. For starters, the Riverside Convalescent Hospital was located on Riverside Boulevard in Sacramento, California and the two encounters the nurse had occurred on March 30, 1978, and April 10, 1978. Four days later on April 14, 1978, the East Area Rapist attacked his thirty-first victim living on Casilada Way — only two minutes away from the hospital.

Hospital

Additionally, suspicious activity started happening in the soon-to-be victim’s neighborhood on April 1, 1978. There is evidence that pinpoints the offender targeting the victim earlier that year in February with prank phone calls, but the unsavory activity increased drastically in the beginning of April.

Furthermore, the innocuous stranger claiming to be “Jack from the town of Quincy” last visited the hospital on the evening of April 10, 1978. The soon-to-be victim reported hearing strange noises emanating from her backyard patio during the night of April 11, 1978. It’s not specified whether this happened late in the early morning hours or the following night that would lead to April 12, 1978.

Regardless, the dates coincide with the young man at the hospital matching the East Area Rapists’ description and his stalking prowess that generally happened in the course of two weeks before an assault. The peculiar activity in the targeted location included residents having their side gate doors left sprawled open overnight, scratching noises on windows, dogs barking hellaciously throughout the night, and a dubious dark-colored 1960 Cadillac seen in the vicinity.

Number 2

The next reason is psychiatric hospitals. Granted, this is purely conjectural. If we are to believe “Jack from the town of Quincy” was the East Area Rapist, he briefly stated he was a former patient in a psychiatric ward in Sacramento, California. Another incident where a similar statement was made occurred on Friday, January 6, 1978, when a man professing to be the East Side Rapist (this moniker was used for a while until the East Area Rapist moniker dubbed by the Sacramento Bee stuck) called a counseling service.

Transcript

Caller – Can you help me?

Volunteer – What’s the problem?

Caller – I have a problem. I need help because I don’t want to do this anymore.

Volunteer – Do what?

Caller – Well, I guess I can tell you guys. You’re not tracing this call, are you?

Volunteer – No, we are not tracing any calls.

Caller – I am the East Side Rapist and I feel the urge coming on to do this again. I don’t want to do it, but then I do. Is there anyone there that can help me? I don’t want to hurt these women or their husbands anymore. Are you tracing this call?

Volunteer – We are not tracing this call. Do you want a counselor?

Caller – No. I have been to counseling all my life. I was at Stockton State Hospital. I shouldn’t tell you that. I guess I can trust you guys. Are you tracing this call?

Volunteer – No, we are not tracing this call.

Caller – I believe you are tracing this call.

Throughout the phone call, the unidentified caller would repeatedly change his tone. His attitude shifted from normalcy to violent and angry when he would ask if the phone call was being traced. This was prevalent in the East Area Rapists’ series of attacks where his disdain for the police increased as he spoke about them, while he would sporadically sit in a corner and weep, hyperventilate, and ask forgiveness from his mother after he sexually violated an innocent woman.

Likewise, the investigators followed up on the hospital lead but were unable to obtain information from Stockton State Hospital because they didn’t have the name of the caller; thus, the administrators couldn’t provide any names or results of the patients because it would compromise confidentiality.

While this phone call can be considered a prank by someone else entirely, it transpired during a time where the East Area Rapist was making phone calls to the police and victims in a frenzy — particularly in a period of time where he wasn’t attacking women. His cooling down period was between December 2, 1979 – January 28, 1978. Perhaps there was some form of truth to the statement he made about not wanting to commit crimes anymore but the urge was overpowering him?

When he did return from out of the shadows on January 28, 1978, in Sacramento, California, he attacked two young teenagers. According to the crime scene, he seemed to use a much more volatile approach by kicking in the front door to the home, as if he couldn’t contain his angst and desire more subtly. Moreover, days later on February 2, 1978, the tragic murder of Brian and Katie Maggiore occurred in Rancho Cordova–in a cluster area where many other victims in the town were earmarked.

Afterward, he visited Stockton, California on March 18, 1978, and attacked his thirtieth victim. Following this, the mysterious “Jack from the town of Quincy” paid a visit to Riverside Convalescent Hospital, and the thirty-first victim was subsequently attacked on April 14, 1978, in Sacramento, California. The conversation with the counseling service and the interaction between the nurse featured involvement in counseling and psychiatric wards in Stockton and Sacramento — the two locations where the East Area Rapist targeted his subsequent victims and it would be the last time he operated in these locations.

There are other reasons that could further substantiate my conclusion, however; including the appearance and apparel of the male. The blue windbreaker is what sets this encounter apart because the suspect was often reported wearing a similar jacket during his crimes. Unfortunately, one thing that makes this case exceptionally difficult is the description of the notorious assailant essentially matched the majority of young males in high school and college.

Another likely reason is the stranger indicating he had sexual problems. There is no elaboration on those issues but it’s a well-known fact the East Area Rapist had performance problems ranging from maintaining an erection and climaxing.

In conclusion, these are the reasons why I believe “Jack from the town of Quincy” could be the East Area Rapist. The coincidences are staggering, but this case has many of these stories that turned out not to be the perpetrator. Nonetheless, all of these bits and pieces combined provide a possibility the stranger was the man law enforcement has been pursuing for over forty years.

Side Note

There is one final intriguing aspect about the man at the Riverside Convalescent Hospital introducing himself as “Jack from the town of Quincy.” It’s possible this name could have been a reference to the television show, “Quincy M.E.” The program centered around Jack Klugman, a coroner who investigated the deaths of people that could have been murdered. The first episode aired on October 3, 1976, and was titled “Go Fight City Hall … to the Death,” and was about the rape and murder of a civil servant. The show ultimately concluded after eight seasons on May 11, 1983.

Quincy M.E.

Speaking of hospitals and false names, there is an interesting story that was recently released to the public. I will be upfront – I am skeptical of this event, but considering it’s relatively new information, I’ll discuss the story provided by the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department via the Sacramento Bee newspaper.

At 11:47 a.m. on Tuesday, May 30, 1977, a man matching the description of the East Area entered the American River Hospital in Carmichael, California, that has since been closed. He sought treatment for a shoulder injury. When he filled out forms before seeing a doctor, the information he used was false, including his driver’s license for identification that featured someone else’s photo. It was later discovered to had been stolen in 1975 from Local 18 Warehouseman’s’ Union.

The nursing staff felt uncomfortable by his presence and he wouldn’t give them his name so one of the nurses used her initials — BK (Barbara Kennedy) — to sign the medical form. All of these things seemed suspicious to the employees and they promptly notified law enforcement, but by the time they arrived the patient fled the hospital.

The current investigators on the East Area Rapist case seem to believe this could the infamous serial-rapist. The main reasons why are the description of the man, the stolen identification card, and the shoulder injury which comes with a (kind of) convincing story.

The East Area Rapist attacked his twenty-second victim just two days beforehand on May 28, 1977, in Sacramento, California. After the assault, the offender scaled a fence that led to a precipitous canal. Thereafter, he disappeared for three months during the summer before reemerging on September 6, 1977, in Stockton, California. Due to those details, investigators are under the impression the East Area Rapist may have possibly injured his shoulder when fleeing the crime after the assault; which in turn was the reason for his sudden three-month break.

These are logical deductions and could be very accurate. However, this can only be hypothesized. There is no factual evidence that suggests the offender hurt his shoulder afterward. Furthermore, I’m not sure why this lead wasn’t presented to the general populace much sooner. The detectives who released this information on February 2, 2018, aren’t the same people who were assigned to the case in the 70s, so we can’t make an astute judgment on the original investigators thought process.

However, this information should have been made public as soon as the police learned of it because it was pivotal. It would have propelled the community to be on the lookout for someone they know or have seen with an injured shoulder. The tips the police could have received would have been substantial. Instead, it was released forty years after the fact primarily due to current investigators looking over old files. There aren’t many people who will be able to recall someone with a shoulder injury four decades ago. Moreover, due to the extensive delay, a lot of people — if they had valuable information — could have already passed away, thus causing potential evidence to be cast aside.

Ultimately, this case is very enigmatic and my opinions have fluctuated often throughout researching its historicity. There are days I uphold the belief the offender was young when he began his rape spree — possibly in high school — but other days I think he was a lot older than I initially presumed. Sometimes, I think he could be the notorious ransacker that operated in Visalia, California, and on other days I find it hard to comprehend. I have trouble reconciling these things, and maybe one way to propel this case forward is to let go of preconceived notions and follow the footsteps of Jack Klugman and continue pursuing the truth.

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